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Social Media: Our Pandora’s Box

For many, anger is less painful than fear.  Denial is even less troubling.  Sadly, both ways of reacting to a pandemic are worse than ineffective.  They not only divide us, even as families, but they undermine the efforts of those best equipped to deal with it.

The problem isn’t just fake news or even misunderstood news, it’s that we are coping with something different, something that even changes just when we think we’ve got a grip on it. Scientists comes up with theories based on past experience, but often there are new challenges, so to some extent they have to learn by trial and error. So, when lives are at stake they have to try to err on the side of safety in spite of politics and paranoia.

The other challenge is that today’s nations and continents are interconnected in a multitude of ways that no one can control completely. Parts of the world being at war with each other and even more parts distrusting one another complicates any international or national organizations’ ability to gather information and coordinate the fight against a pandemic.

Attacks on those working to solve the problem not only undermine their efforts, they can slow down progress enough to cost lives. Turning the pandemic into a political power struggle could defeat us, instead of the disease.

No one is infallible, but those with training and years of experience in fighting disease have a huge head start on the rest of us, including the politicians.  Winning or losing one round doesn’t mean we give up the fight or ignore those with the knowledge passed down from others before them. They also struggled, but won the long battles against diseases such as tuberculosis, tetanus, chickenpox, smallpox, polio, hepatitis, measles, whooping cough, mumps, and diptheria with vaccines.

I have been writing about prayer.  Now I’m asking for prayer for cures for what are destroying us, both viruses and division.