What Was the Most Important “Do Not” According to Jesus?

Okay…it mystifies me that we as Christians don’t seem to recognize that of all the “do nots,” the one Jesus was strongest on was “do not judge.” And obviously he didn’t mean “do not judge people for the good things they do.” He meant do not judge others for the sins they commit.

Why?  Why give us rules and then say “do not judge” those breaking them?

#1  because no one is without sin or in secular terms: nobody is perfect.

#2  because the message of Jesus is that we are loved by God in our imperfect, broken, unfinished, “sinful’ humanity, and once we recognize that we are loved in spite of our selfishness and lack of love, it gives us the grace to begin growing in loving others as Jesus and God love us.

#3  because we do not know the “hand” anyone else was dealt. Only God does, so only God can judge them. And only God will know when they can accept His love enough to truly see themselves without condemnation and be freed to become more like Jesus in what ever way God is calling them to grow. (Not in whatever way we think they should be growing at any particular time.)

Short version:

1. Nobody’s perfect.
2. When we recognize our brokenness and learn that we are loved as we are, we become free to change and grow more loving.
3.Only God knows if, when, and how He is calling and freeing someone to grow.

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About Eileen

Mother of five, grandmother of eleven, great-grandmother of seven, 1955 -1959 Rice University in Houston, TX. Taught primary grades; Was Associate Post Director of Religious Education at Ft. Campbell, KY; Consultant on the Myers/Briggs Type Indicator; Presently part time Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper for Architect husband of fifty-seven years. Blog: Laughter: Carbonated Grace

Posted on May 17, 2016, in B4Peace, faith, Forgiveness, Jesus, Judging, Love, rebirth, Saved by grace and not by law, spiritual growth, spirituality and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 6 Comments.

  1. That’s true, however (and unfortunately) we often can see our mistakes from others behaviour. So, if by “mental judgement” we can improve ourselves, it’s so bad at the end… ?

    • I think when we hear someone judging another person they have a “look down on” attitude. It’s a judgement of the person not the act. Recognizing ourselves in others isn’t a mental one up. I have to struggle with my tendency to be judgmental of people who do judge others. 🙂 I find it funny ironic, but also a clue to me that I can’t look down on anyone.

  2. I’ve always struggled with the idea that God loves us individually. I think it’s one of the main themes in my novels. Perfectionists tend to judge themselves so harshly that they crowd out any thought of God’s love for them. Sadly perfectionists have a hard time not judging others as well because they set such impossible standards. Rest seems like a dirty word to them and they can’t quite fully believe that God will find pleasure in them even with their flaws.

    • I used to not want unconditional love. I wanted to be loved for my talents and good traits. Then I got in touch with my shadow side and began to be grateful that life isn’t about perfection or ego, but about learning to love ourselves and others as we actually are and thus discover the paradoxical reality that then we are freed to grow more loving and less self centered. God is way beyond my understanding, which makes me grateful for Jesus as a flesh and blood expression of love that I can relate to.

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