An Approach to Decision Making

I’ve taken a lot of classes that included processes for decision making. Several things have stuck with me in spite of my unreliable memory.
Perhaps the most important one is that we each have natural tools/gifts, but they are only part of what is needed for an effective problem solving process. Effective problem solving not only needs a team approach, it requires recognition of the equal importance of diverse gifts.

First, it needs a vision of the long term goal, not just the quick fix.

Second, it needs brainstorming that includes all possibilities, even seemingly “pie in the sky” ones.

Third, each possibility will have a down side. So, list and evaluate the down sides. Eliminate the ones with downsides that you feel you cannot live with.

Fourth, look at the practical problems needing solving for each possibility and generate reasonable solutions.

Fifth, Now re-evaluate, in terms of (a) personal values, (b) downsides, (c) actual resources, those possibilities that ended up having reasonable solutions for problems. Then make your choice, or if a group decision is needed, come to consensus.

Note: For believers in Jesus Christ as the perfect human expression of God’s love for all, this process would involve both communal and personal prayer for guidance at the beginning, at any conflict points or questionable areas, and at the final decision making point, and would include evaluations throughout in the light of the values fleshed out in the life and death of Jesus.

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About Eileen

Mother of five, grandmother of eleven, great-grandmother of seven Rice University in Houston, TX. Taught primary grades; Was Associate Post Director of Religious Education at Ft. Campbell, KY; Consultant on the Myers/Briggs Type Indicator; Presently part time Administrative Assistant/Bookkeeper for Architect husband of fifty-five years. Blog: Laughter: Carbonated Grace

Posted on March 4, 2014, in Answered Prayer, B4Peace, Decision Making, Political, Prayer, relationships, Spiritual, Teaching/Learning Experiences and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Have you ever deliberately paced yourself through a decision-making process such as the one you describe and then thrown all your careful thought aside and gone with the instinctive course of action that first popped into your head? I have. And, usually, I rue my impulsiveness.

  2. Sometimes I just go straight to values! The method in this post actually works best with a diverse group of people,. It’s a combination of some things used in a Management Workshop based on the MBTI. An attempt to help the big picture people and the detail people use their gifts as a team.

  3. Love no. 1 and 3, Eileen. I think many of us fail to think long-term when we want a quick fix.

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